Perfidious Albion

I've just emerged from another Sunday morning appointment with the politicians on the TV, accompanied by my only real constant each week, a plate of the kippers that do get my vote (and maintain consistently his satisfaction levels). This week, we really are in the thick of it with the Tory leadership contest, the revelations … Continue reading Perfidious Albion

The Hows and Whys of the Hampshire heaths

With the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Kingsley, I posted recently about his contribution to a sense of 'place' in this corner of North-East Hampshire where I live, which referred to one of his works ("Prose Idylls, New and Old"), and how it described the 'rough commons' terrain of the area. Since that post, … Continue reading The Hows and Whys of the Hampshire heaths

Necropolis Railway took me to a dramatic ultimate destination!

A curious railway company, running 'funeral trains' between its own terminus just off London Waterloo, and Brookwood Cemetery in Surrey provides the backdrop to a fantastically atmospheric detective story ["The Necropolis Railway", Andrew Martin (2005), London, Faber & Faber]. Brookwood was the largest cemetery in the world when it opened, and remains the largest in … Continue reading Necropolis Railway took me to a dramatic ultimate destination!

Real Bread – is flour, water and salt really poetry, science, history – or politics?

To mark the start of "Real Bread Week" (23rd Feb - 3rd Mar 2019),  I did everything in my power to pass on the 'sourdough bug' to my 10 year old niece Olivia. I'm not sure whether sourdough baking is more poetry or science - looking after the starter culture; autolysing the dough; the rhythms … Continue reading Real Bread – is flour, water and salt really poetry, science, history – or politics?